Science/Nature

Antarctic: Nasa shares close-up photos of big PIG iceberg

[ad_1] Image copyright NASA ICEBRIDGE/Brooke Medley Image caption Icebergs calve from the front of glaciers that terminate in the sea Scientists this week got their first close-up look at the big new iceberg that's calved from Pine Island Glacier (PIG) in the Antarctic.The block, which has the designation B-46, initially covered 225 sq km. Given the fashion in recent years to compare such bergs with the area of Manhattan Island,
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Sir David Attenborough lends voice to Netflix’s Our Planet series

[ad_1] Image copyright Netflix Image caption Sir David will narrate but not appear in the Netflix series Sir David Attenborough is to narrate a documentary series for streaming service Netflix about "the beauty and fragility of our natural world".It has been produced in collaboration with Silverback Films, whose director Alastair Fothergill made Planet Earth and The Blue Planet for the BBC.Speaking at a World Wildlife Fund (WWF) event on Thursday,
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Keystone XL Pipeline: US judge orders halt on construction

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The pipeline has been the subject of protests by environmentalists and Native American groups A United States judge has blocked the construction of a controversial oil pipeline from Canada to the US.The judge in the state of Montana said the Trump administration had "discarded" facts when it approved the Keystone XL Pipeline in 2017.It had been rejected two years earlier by the Obama
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Climate Change: Arctic ‘no safe harbour’ for breeding birds

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Birds migrating to the Arctic tundra The Arctic is no longer the safe haven it once was for nesting birds, a new scientific report warns.Having nests raided by predators is a bigger threat for birds flocking to breed than in the past, it shows.This raises the risk of extinction for birds on Arctic shores, say researchers.They point to a link with climate change,
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Delhi air: Eating berries and wearing masks to beat pollution

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Every winter, a thick blanket of smog descends on large parts of India and people begin a losing fight against the frightening levels of pollution. Thousands land up in doctors' clinics with breathlessness, fill up hospital beds with lung problems and many are forced to stay off school or work.And with measures announced by the federal and state governments to curb pollution not making any impact,
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Delhi air: Eating berries and wearing masks to beat pollution

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Every winter, a thick blanket of smog descends on large parts of India and people begin a losing fight against the frightening levels of pollution. Thousands land up in doctors' clinics with breathlessness, fill up hospital beds with lung problems and many are forced to stay off school or work.And with measures announced by the federal and state governments to curb pollution not making any impact,
Science/Nature

Delhi air: Eating berries and wearing masks to beat pollution

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Every winter, a thick blanket of smog descends on large parts of India and people begin a losing fight against the frightening levels of pollution. Thousands land up in doctors' clinics with breathlessness, fill up hospital beds with lung problems and many are forced to stay off school or work.And with measures announced by the federal and state governments to curb pollution not making any impact,
Science/Nature

Stephen Hawking personal effects fetch £1.8m at auction

[ad_1] Image copyright Christie's Image caption A copy of Prof Hawking's best-selling book, signed with a thumbprint, was among the items up for sale Personal effects of Stephen Hawking, including a signed copy of his 1965 PhD thesis, have raised more than £1.8m at auction.A total of 22 items owned by the Cambridge physicist, who died in March, were auctioned by Christie's.The copy of his thesis titled Properties of Expanding
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Finland: Where second-hand comes first

[ad_1] Image caption Kati Rossi was looking for a second-hand bookshelf With her daughter and baby son, Kati Rossi is prowling a suburb of Helsinki in the hunt for a second-hand bookshelf.Across the road looms a Swedish furniture giant, but Kati is scouring a huge municipal re-use centre instead. “I don’t want to go to IKEA,” she tells me. "I will find something much more interesting here, and much more
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Oldest cave painting of an animal discovered in Borneo

[ad_1] The oldest cave painting of an animal has been discovered by scientists in rural Borneo.After trekking for several days through mountain forests, the researchers led by Griffith University in Queensland, Australia managed to access the cave.Once inside they described being "surrounded" by art. One painting found by the group is believed to depict a banteng, a South Asian wild cow, and is at least 40,000 years old.In the same
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‘Oldest animal painting’ discovered in Borneo

[ad_1] Image copyright NAture Image caption This tracing of the cave wall shows the 40,000-year-old painting on the far right. The black box shows the area which was used for dating the cave art The earliest known painting of an animal has been identified in a cave on the island of Borneo.The artwork, which is at least 40,000 years old, is thought to be the oldest example of figurative painting
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‘Oldest animal painting’ discovered in Borneo

[ad_1] Image copyright NAture Image caption This tracing of the cave wall shows the 40,000-year-old painting on the far right. The black box shows the area which was used for dating the cave art The earliest known painting of an animal has been identified in a cave on the island of Borneo.The artwork, which is at least 40,000 years old, is thought to be the oldest example of figurative painting
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Climate change: Bug covered ‘bionic mushroom’ generates clean energy

[ad_1] Image copyright American Chemical Society Image caption A button mushroom coated in bugs and nanowires can produce electricity from light US researchers have successfully tested the rather whacky idea of producing electricity from a mushroom covered in bacteria.The scientists used 3D printing to attach clusters of energy-producing bugs to the cap of a button mushroom.The fungus provided the ideal environment to allow the cyanobacteria to generate a small amount
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Climate change: Bug covered ‘bionic mushroom’ generates clean energy

[ad_1] Image copyright American Chemical Society Image caption A button mushroom coated in bugs and nanowires can produce electricity from light US researchers have successfully tested the rather whacky idea of producing electricity from a mushroom covered in bacteria.The scientists used 3D printing to attach clusters of energy-producing bugs to the cap of a button mushroom.The fungus provided the ideal environment to allow the cyanobacteria to generate a small amount
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ExoMars: Where to send Europe’s robot rover?

[ad_1] Image copyright AIRBUS Image caption ExoMars: A copy of the rover undergoing testing Scientists and engineers are to meet in Leicester to choose a landing site on Mars for Europe's 2020 rover. The six-wheeled robot will be targeted at one of two near-equatorial terrains on the Red Planet. The ExoMars Site Selection Working Group must weigh which of the pair represents the biggest scientific interest but also offers a
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Northern white rhino: New hopes for IVF rescue

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Sudan was the last of his kind A new study raises hopes of saving one of the last animals of its kind.A victim of poaching, the northern white rhino population has been reduced to just two females, which are both unable to breed. DNA evidence shows the rhino is more closely related than previously thought to its southern white cousin.Creating rhino hybrids using
Science/Nature

Metop weather satellite prepares for lift-off

[ad_1] Image copyright ESA Image caption The Metop satellites circle the globe probing the state of the atmosphere Europe is about to put a front-line weather satellite in orbit that has components which are over a decade old. The Metop-C spacecraft is due to launch from French Guiana late on Tuesday local time, and will circle the globe, gathering data that will feed into daily forecasts. The satellite was procured
Science/Nature

Helpline to tackle bullying in chemistry

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images/Universal Images Group Bullying and harassment is such a problem in the world of chemistry that a dedicated helpline is being set up for victims, a scientific body says.The Royal Society of Chemistry says people were being denied opportunities because of "a culture of secrecy" and the 'unchecked power of managers'.The research showed both men and women have been bullied and harassed by colleagues.But it was
Science/Nature

Ron Howard: Creating vision of a future Mars colony

[ad_1] Image copyright NAtional Geographic Image caption The series Mars envisages how a pioneer human settlement might function on the Red Planet To mark the second season of the television series Mars, Hollywood director Ron Howard talked to the BBC about creating a realistic depiction of the first human colonies on the Red Planet.If humankind is to expand out into the Universe, then Mars is likely to be our first
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Large hydropower dams ‘not sustainable’ in the developing world

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Problems at the Oroville dam in California in 2017 saw 10,000 people evacuated A new study says that many large scale hydropower projects in Europe and the US have been disastrous for the environment.Dozens of these dams are being removed every year, with many considered dangerous and uneconomic.But the authors fear that the unsustainable nature of these projects has not been recognised in
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Dinosaur world ‘more colourful than we thought’

[ad_1] Image copyright Yale University Image caption Spot the dinosaur egg Why do some birds lay colourful eggs? From pale blue to speckled red, they come in every shade and hue.The answer, say scientists, is that coloured eggs evolved millions of years ago in birds' ancestors, the dinosaurs.The patterns and colours may have served to camouflage eggs from predators as white eggs stand out more against darker backgrounds. Thus, the
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Revealed: The secret of the poet’s daffodil

[ad_1] Image copyright Rodney Lay/RHS Image caption Narcissus poeticus (Pheasant’s eye daffodil) The secrets of a flower known as the poet's daffodil have fallen to science.The genetic code of the daffodil's chloroplast - the DNA responsible for photosynthesis - has been mapped for the first time.Narcissus poeticus was one of the first daffodils to be cultivated, and is linked to the Greek legend of Narcissus. In Greek mythology, the flower
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Scottish researchers create ‘crystal maze’ for light

[ad_1] Image copyright Channel 4 Image caption The TV programme Crystal Maze is rather different to the research experiment Researchers at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh have created a "crystal maze" to control how light spreads. However, unlike the Channel 4 TV game show, this one is telling scientists more about how light can be manipulated. It could also lead to new and better devices in fields like healthcare and telecommunications.
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Morbid exhibits of UCL’s Pathology Museum

[ad_1] Dating back to the 1800s the UCL’s Pathology Museum has more than 2,000 specimens of human remains.Among the macabre collection are a sword swallower’s oesophagus and a plaster cast of a hand belonging to a man that had acromegaly and was 8ft 9in (2.6m) tall.The museum is normally closed to the public but for one weekend in September it opened its doors as part of Open House London.The BBC
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Fireworks: How do they work and how are they made?

[ad_1] Occasions like Bonfire Night, New Years Eve, Diwali and the Fourth of July weekend are marked by fireworks displays every year.But the flare and skill of fireworks today wouldn't exist, without some simple, but clever, chemistry.So how do fireworks work exactly? How are they made – and how do they get their different colours? Dr Joanna Buckley invited the BBC to the chemistry laboratories at the University of Sheffield
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InSight: The jeopardy of landing on Mars

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionNasa's Insight video is fronted by chief engineer Rob ManningThe American space agency has released a video describing the perilous journey its InSight probe will make to the surface of Mars later this month.Fronted by Rob Manning, the chief engineer at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the film describes the various stages of what is termed "entry, descent and landing", or EDL.It
Science/Nature

Five products you didn’t know were harming the environment

[ad_1] Image copyright PA Image caption Research suggests sunscreen could contribute to coral bleaching Palau has become the first country to impose a widespread ban on sunscreen in order to protect its vulnerable coral reefs - but for many consumers this may be the first they have heard of the product's harmful effects.Researchers believe 10 chemical ingredients found in sunscreen are highly toxic to marine life, and can make coral
Science/Nature

Orion capsule: Europe delivers astronaut spaceship’s first ‘powerhouse’

[ad_1] Image copyright AIRBUS Image caption The European Service Module pushes the Orion capsule through space European industry has handed over a key part of the spaceship infrastructure that will take humans beyond Earth and into the wider Solar System. At a ceremony at Bremen airport in Germany, American officials accepted the first service module that will power an Orion capsule. Orion is the next-generation vehicle that the US is
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Government urged to ditch ‘bonkers’ fracking plan

[ad_1] Image copyright PA Fracking is controversial, this much we know. But the government has ratcheted-up tensions with plans that could see shale gas projects fast-tracked in future. Those tensions were particularly apparent this week at a packed out parliamentary debate. Conservative, Labour, Liberal Democrat and SNP MPs lined up to lambast the proposals and call for a rethink. So what's causing all the consternation? Well, one idea that the
Science/Nature

Fish fingers surprisingly sustainable, say conservationists

[ad_1] Image copyright PA Fish fingers are surprisingly sustainable and some of the best products to buy are also the cheapest, the Marine Conservation Society says.Some 85% of the fish in 48 supermarket own-brand and branded fingers came from sustainable sources, its study found. The MCS's Rajina Gurung said it was an "unexpected" result, adding it was hard for shoppers to know the source of the fish at a glance
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Norfolk cattle farmer warns of mass balloon release hazard

[ad_1] Image copyright Cait Clarke Image caption Cait Clarke was checking 12 of the animals she keeps in a field in nearby Ludham when she found 10 balloons, with one in a calf's mouth A cattle farmer has warned people against releasing balloons after one of her calves tried to eat one.Cait Clarke, of Runham, near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, farms about 50 Aberdeen Angus cattle.She was checking 12 of the
Science/Nature

Rise in UK weather extremes over the last decade – Met Office

[ad_1] Image copyright PAUL ELLIS Image caption While 2018 saw an extremely hot summer in the UK, the previous decade was also warmer than the long-term average A new Met Office report says the UK has experienced more weather extremes over the last 10 years when compared to previous decades.The hottest days have become hotter, warm spells have increased, while the coldest days are not as cold. The number of
Science/Nature

Campaign set up to oppose spaceport in Sutherland

[ad_1] Image copyright Orbex Image caption Concept art of a Sutherland satellite launch site A pressure group has been set up to oppose plans to construct a spaceport in Sutherland.Land on the Melness Crofting Estate has been identified as the potential location for the launching of rockets carrying micro satellites.The UK Space Agency and Highlands and Islands Enterprise are among organisations supporting the project.But some crofters have concerns about its
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Project to decode ‘all complex life’ on Earth

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images A mission to sequence the genome of every known animal, plant, fungus and single-celled organism known collectively as protozoa has been launched by an international team. The Earth BioGenome Project (EBP) has been described as a "moonshot for biology".A key aim is to use the information in efforts to conserve threatened species. Scientists say clues about how species adapt to environmental change could be hidden
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Coral: Palau to ban sunscreen products to protect reefs

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Palau is set to become the first country to impose a widespread ban on sunscreen in an effort to protect its vulnerable coral reefs. The government has signed a law that restricts the sale and use of sunscreen and skincare products that contain a list of ten different chemicals. Researchers believe that these ingredients are highly toxic to marine life, and can make coral more
Science/Nature

Sayuz rocket: ‘Faulty sensor’ led to launch failure

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionThe malfunction became apparent about 90 seconds into the flightA Russian Soyuz rocket capsule was forced to make an emergency landing shortly after launch last month because of a faulty sensor, investigators say.Russian officials believe the component was damaged during assembly.They warned that two other Soyuz rockets could be defective, and said additional checks have been introduced.The rocket had been transporting
Science/Nature

Kepler: Nasa’s telescope that found new worlds has been retired

[ad_1] After more than nine years on a space mission, Nasa's Kepler telescope has run out of fuel and will be retired. It's been on the look-out for inhabitable planets across the galaxy - and it found several.Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 every weekday on BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra - if you miss us you can listen back here. [ad_2]
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Hawaii top court approves controversial Thirty Meter Telescope

[ad_1] Image copyright Thirty Meter Telescope Hawaii's Supreme Court has approved construction of what will be the largest single telescope in the world on the controversial site of Mauna Kea.Work on the $1.4bn (£1bn) Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) had paused in 2015 after protests from some native Hawaiians, to whom the land is sacred.The state's top court ruled 4-1 in favour of the scientists on Tuesday.Mauna Kea already has 13
Science/Nature

World’s longest DNA sequence decoded

[ad_1] Image copyright Science Photo Library A team of UK scientists have claimed the record for decoding the world's longest DNA sequence.The scientists produced a DNA read that is about 10,000 times longer than normal, and twice as large as a previous record holder, from Australia.This research has kick-started an Ashes-style competition to sequence an entire chromosome in a single read. The new holder of the trophy for world's longest
Science/Nature

RemoveDebris: UK satellite tracks ‘space junk’

[ad_1] The British-led mission to test techniques to clear up space junk has initiated its second experiment. The RemoveDebris satellite ejected a small object on Sunday and then tracked it using a camera and laser system. This vision-based navigation (VBN) technology essentially tells a pursuing spacecraft how its target is behaving - how its moving and even tumbling. In this video, the target is seen emerging from the right. [ad_2]
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Parker Solar Probe: Nasa’s Sun mission smashes records

[ad_1] Image copyright NASA-JHU-APL Image caption Artwork: Parker must always keep its heatshield pointed at the Sun America's audacious mission to "touch the Sun" has now got nearer to our star than any previous human-made object.The Parker Solar Probe passed the current record of 42.73 million km (26.55 million miles) from the Sun's surface on Monday.The previous record was set by the German-US Helios 2 satellite back in April 1976.
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Rhino horn: Alarm as China eases 25-year ban on rhino and tiger parts

[ad_1] Image copyright CARL DE SOUZA Image caption Rhino horn is highly prized in traditional Chinese medicine Animal conservationists are alarmed over China's decision to partially reverse a ban on the trade of tiger bones and rhino horn.Rhinos and tigers are both endangered in the wild and China prohibited their trade in 1993.But on Monday it said parts from captive animals would be authorised for scientific, medical and cultural use.Experts
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‘Worst year’ for Horsey seals injured by rubbish

[ad_1] Image copyright RSPCA Image caption Seals with rubbish around their necks become unable to fish and are weakened by infection The number of seals with "horrifying" injuries caused by fishing paraphernalia and plastic flying rings is on the rise, a charity has said.The Friends of Horsey Seals monitors the colony in Norfolk and said at least 10 animals currently had nets stuck to them or rings trapped on their
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Chocolate: Origins of delicacy pushed back in time

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The ingredients for chocolate - cocoa powder and cocoa butter - are prepared from cocoa seeds Chocolate has been a delicacy for much longer than previously thought.Botanical evidence shows the plant from which chocolate is made was first grown for food more than 5,000 years ago in the Amazon rainforest.Chemical residues found on ancient pottery suggest cocoa was used as a food, drink
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Brecon project gives water vole a fighting chance

[ad_1] The water vole is one of the key wildlife species in Wales at risk of disappearing altogether, according to conservation body WWF Cymru.It says global threats to wildlife and habitats identified in the Living Planet Report 2018 are echoed in Wales.The Welsh Government said it has set out its priorities for tackling the root causes of biodiversity decline, as the WWF called for politicians to "step up".Water vole numbers
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Climate change is ‘escalator to extinction’ for mountain birds

[ad_1] Image copyright Graham Montgomery Image caption A yellow-throated tanager Scientists have produced new evidence that climate change is driving tropical bird species who live near a mountain top to extinction.Researchers have long predicted many creatures will seek to escape a warmer world by moving towards higher ground.However, those living at the highest levels cannot go any higher, and have been forecast to decline. This study found that eight bird